Posted in Character Development Writing

What Should Your Character Look Like?

What Should Your Character Look Like? Posted on February 5, 2019Leave a comment

What Should Your Character Look Like?  Crafting a character's appearance is often a writer's favourite task when writing a new short story, novel or book — but it's not without its struggles.  In this week's blog post, we talk about how to choose what your characters look like and how their appearance can add an interesting layer to your book, novel or short story. 

On the surface, choosing a character’s appearance seems like an easy and fun task — and in some ways it is. I can’t tell you how many hours I have spent pinning character art on Pinterest when planning out my cast of characters. However, though the process is often enjoyable, crafting a character’s appearance is not as superficial as it sounds.

The picture you paint of your character tells a story in itself. The physical appearance of a character can say so much. It can lead voice to past struggles, events, and even a pre-destined future.

In my experience, the appearance of some characters come to me instantly. I know who they are, their personality and what they physically look like. However, for other characters, a fog shrouds them in my mind and I have to spend some time sharpening the picture. When this happens, I use the following formula to help me craft the character’s appearance.

What Should Your Character Look Like? 
Crafting a character's appearance is often a writer's favourite task when writing a new short story, novel or book — but it's not without its struggles. 

In this week's blog post, we talk about how to choose what your characters look like and how their appearance can add an interesting layer to your book, novel or short story. 

Character Build: This may be determined by their social standing (skinny = poor or plump = rich), career (blacksmith = strong and abilities (slender = agile)

Character Colouring: This includes skin, hair and eye colour. Typically, this will be determined by the world, region, climate of origin – unless, of course they are an anomoly.

Angles: The angles of their face and body should parallel their build and dememour (e.g. Greedy characters are round. Stern and cold charaters are pale and sharp featured.)

Distinguishable Features: Such as scars, birthmarks and freckles to elicit past battles, beauty or individuality.

Style: A reflection of personality, flaws, career and social standing. Are they rebellious? Then perhaps they will dress unlike the others in their class. Do they like the finer things in life? If so, maybe they attend every even with a different statement necklace. Do they stick to the shadows?

Bonus Tip: Each of your characters should be distinguishable by their appearance alone. The last thing you want to do is confuse your reader by having a cast of characters that are near identical. Make each of your characters are unique to help diversify your cast and world.

Happy Scribbling!

Please follow and like us:
error

You may also like:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Visit Us On PinterestVisit Us On InstagramVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On LinkedinCheck Our Feed